Best push broom

Cleaning Tools & Supplies

Push brooms aren’t meant to use with dustpans but rather to move what they’re sweeping away. If you want to collect what you’ve swept, attach a shovel dustpan to your push broom.

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Which push broom is best?

Push brooms are magical cleaning tools, drastically cutting down on the amount of time and effort it takes to sweep away the dust and debris from your floors, restaurants and even barns. Different push brooms with different bristles and features might prove themselves more or less ideal for your situation.

The best push broom for just about any floor and occasion is the Libman 801.0 Push Broom. This push broom has an excellent 24-inch head with polymer bristles that can collect and shift whatever you’re trying to sweep away with ease.

What to know before you buy a push broom

Indoor vs. outdoor

Not every push broom works on any surface with the same quality result. Most are for outside or inside use, with softer push broom bristles made for indoor use. Double-check your prospective push broom before purchasing to see which surface it’s intended.

Debris

Most push brooms work with a particular type of debris in mind, though there are push brooms that can pull double duty. In general, the thicker and coarser the bristles of your push broom, the larger the debris they are intended to move.

Durability

Push brooms are great for rough settings like warehouses, barns and garages. This makes most push brooms incredibly durable. If durability is your primary concern, then pay special attention to the strength of the bristles, handle and supporting brackets at the handle-head junction.

What to look for in a quality push broom

Bristles

The bristles are the section of the push broom that does most of the work. They can use natural or synthetic materials like polyethylene terephthalate. Synthetic bristles are better for chemicals and oils.

The hardness of the bristle is just as important as the material. Softer bristles are best for handling finer wastes and substances like dirt and dust off of dry surfaces. Coarse and tough bristles are best for the most challenging jobs like caked-on dirt and large debris on rough surfaces like concrete. Bristles somewhere in the middle of these are effective on, you guessed it, middle-of-the-road detritus. They are also effective on both wet and dry surfaces.

Handle material

Plastic: These handles are lightweight but can feel very flimsy. They are the least durable handles, all of which combine to make them the cheapest push broom option.

Wood: The former king of the push broom handle materials, this type has fallen out of favor today, although it still is used. They have a good feel and solid weight, but they quickly break down when exposed to the elements, especially moisture.

Steel: This is the most durable although equally most expensive option for push broom handles. They are quite heavy and can wear you out faster compared to using plastic or wood handle materials.

Grips

Even the best material of handles need a good grip. Generally made of rubber or foam, handle grips provide extra comfort, especially for longer and harder push broom tasks.

How much you can expect to spend on a push broom

Push brooms are very affordable no matter the heavy-duty need you might have for them. They typically cost $20-$30, although there are push brooms for less or more, depending on what you need.

Push broom FAQ

Is it necessary to clean a push broom?

A. Yes, it is. Dust, dirt and other debris can build up within the bristles of any broom, which can drastically limit its effectiveness. The easiest way to clean your push broom is to soak it in warm, soapy water, followed by a good rinsing. You can also disinfect the handle while you’re at it.

What is the difference between unflagged and flagged bristles?

A. Unflagged push broom bristles aren’t split, preventing clogging and perfect for wet and rough surfaces with thicker detritus. Flagged bristles are split, making them better suited to really fine amounts of dirt on dry surfaces. Flagged bristles are also occasionally called feathered bristles.

What’s the best push broom to buy?

Top push broom

Libman 801.0 Push Broom

Libman 801.0 Push Broom

What you need to know: This highly rated and dependable push broom is the perfect choice for any needs.

What you’ll love: An affordable price doesn’t sacrifice any of the quality you would want from your push broom.

What you should consider: This push broom just isn’t a good option for floors with finishes.

Where to buy: Sold by Amazon

Top push broom for the money

AKOMA Lightweight Push Broom

AKOMA Lightweight Push Broom

What you need to know: This is an inexpensive push broom for a budget that still gets the job done.

What you’ll love: An ergonomic grip significantly limits the discomfort one might experience from use, and it works great on wet and dry surfaces.

What you should consider: It isn’t quite as sturdy as one would expect or want it to be.

Where to buy: Sold by Amazon

Worth checking out

TreeLen Outdoor Indoor Push Broom

TreeLen Outdoor Indoor Push Broom

What you need to know: This is a reliable and steady push broom for just about any use.

What you’ll love: An adjustable handle makes it easy to wield, and the stiff bristles make it perfect for outdoor use.

What you should consider: Some find this push broom to be a bit too flimsy.

Where to buy: Sold by Amazon

 

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Jordan C. Woika writes for BestReviews. BestReviews has helped millions of consumers simplify their purchasing decisions, saving them time and money.

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