New tech can detect your mood

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Feeling healthy? Have a tattoo tell you whether it's all going well on the inside. That is the idea behind UC San Diego's Biosensor Tattoo: the tiny temporary tattoo monitors the pH levels and lactate content in a wearer's sweat to assess the metabolic health of a patient. It's supposed to help athletes know if they're overdoing it, and whether their stamina is improving with exercise. But will it come in sailing anchor and "I (heart) mum" versions?

Feeling healthy? Have a tattoo tell you whether it’s all going well on the inside. That is the idea behind UC San Diego’s Biosensor Tattoo: the tiny temporary tattoo monitors the pH levels and lactate content in a wearer’s sweat to assess the metabolic health of a patient. It’s supposed to help athletes know if they’re overdoing it, and whether their stamina is improving with exercise. But will it come in sailing anchor and “I (heart) mum” versions?

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  • The DareDroid is a biomechanic cocktail-making dress on display at the "Technosensual" exhibition in Vienna. Sensors around the wearer's neck detect when someone approaches and allow the system to dispense a cocktail. If they move into the wearer's personal space, the dress stops dispensing the drink.
  • This concept dress called Bubelle by Philip's Design interacts with and predicts the wearer's emotional state by changing colors. A beautiful white can turn into a relaxed blue. Philip's dresses are made from high-tech materials and are still in the concept phase.
  • The dress that turns transparent when the wearer is aroused. Would you try it? Dutch design collective Studio Roosegaarde have developed this sensual dress called Intimacy 2.0 together with designer Anouk Wipprecht. Made of leather and smart e-foils, it explores the relationship between technology and intimacy. The high-tech panels are stimulated by the heartbeat of the wearer. Initially opaque or white, they become increasingly transparent when exposed by electricity - in this case a racing heart.
  • The goal for many developers is to make tech as "empathetic" as another human being. The AutoEmotive initiative at MIT's Media Lab aims to prevent accidents with a multi-sensor-equipped Audi. The car's cameras and electrical sensors would watch for stress, distraction or tiredness and adjust lighting, music and even the car's color to increase the driver's awareness.
  • Having an extra way to understand others' emotions -- or even your own -- can enhance comprehension levels for everyone, but especially for people with autism spectrum disorder. Emotient's Facet software includes games that monitor the user's reactions and "can help children with autism recognize other people's emotions through facial expressions as well as express their own feelings," says Marian Bartlett, lead scientist at Emotient.
  • Feeling healthy? Have a tattoo tell you whether it's all going well on the inside. That is the idea behind UC San Diego's Biosensor Tattoo: the tiny temporary tattoo monitors the pH levels and lactate content in a wearer's sweat to assess the metabolic health of a patient. It's supposed to help athletes know if they're overdoing it, and whether their stamina is improving with exercise. But will it come in sailing anchor and "I (heart) mum" versions?
  • Computing your mood

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