Thousands line up for first day of A-Line ‘train to the plane’ service

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DENVER -- They waited in the sun for hours, watching the dedication ceremonies at Denver International Airport on the big screen, in a line that grew to thousands.

Amid tight security, just before noon, the gates opened and the flood of people began to climb on board, all wanting to be part of a new chapter in Denver history.

“I think years from now we're going to look back on this moment and this day and years from now we'll think nothing of taking the train out to the airport,” Carey Gibson said.

Known as the "train to the plane," travelers can ride the train on the A-Line for free on Friday and Saturday. There are eight stations along the line and it takes 37 minutes to go from the airport to Union Station.

Details on the "Train to the Plane"
Service times and map
Fares

Stations and parking

David Sena brought his bike on board and has been on every inaugural RTD route since 1994.

“Trains, planes and automobiles is one of my passions, so i think it's a very exciting day for not only RTD, but it’s exciting for the airport and it's exciting for the whole region,” Sena said.

The Bradley family said waiting in line for 2 1/2 hours was worth it.

“Because we like the train, we love RTD. I take the light rail to work everyday,” John Bradley said.

The one thing everybody agrees on is it's a super-smooth ride.

RELATED: Guide to riding the plane to the train

But with more people getting on close to DIA, the more crowded the train became. Cassie Hale barely made it on with her luggage, the first person on the first car actually taking the train to the plane to Dallas.

“I came thinking I could get on the bus if I needed to, but I was hoping this would be an option,” Hale said. “But it was great; it worked out perfect.”

As the train jets to the airport, sometimes hitting 79 mph, you really get to take in the scenery.

“We'll have lunch there, come back,” Francisco Terrones said. “Retired kind of do all sorts of things.”

When we pulled into the station greeted by RTD officials, the crowd applauded.

“For the region and for Denver, the University of Colorado A-Line is just … it's a game changer,” RTD general manager David Genova said.

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