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DENVER (KDVR) — With a Supreme Court battle over Roe v. Wade looming, leaders here in Colorado say they want to make sure Coloradans have the right to an abortion.

A new bill sponsored by Democratic leaders in the House and Senate would not change anything about Colorado’s abortion care. Lawmakers said they are just getting the state in position if Roe vs Wade is overturned.

“This bill is simply in response to what’s happening,” said House Majority Leader Danaya Esgar of Pueblo.

Colorado is one of six states without a threshold on when anyone can get an abortion. Lawmakers formally introduced a bill Thursday looking to keep things that way.

“There are no affirmative protections in statute. And so in a world in which Roe v. Wade falls, we want to make it clear that regardless of what happens at the Supreme Court access to abortion care in Colorado is protected,” said Senator Julie Gonzales.

“This bill puts into statute that these are actual fundamental rights for all Coloradans,” said Esgar.

The sponsors say they waited until after three pro-life measures from House Republican bills underwent hearings this week. Had they been voted through, they would have outlawed abortion in the state. It would have been made a felony for doctors doing the procedure in most instances and required the demographics and health conditions of people getting abortions to be made public.

They all failed but pro-life groups say they will continue to speak out against the new pro-choice measure.

“You can’t say every individual has a right to abortion without first defining abortion,” said Will Duffy, a spokesman for Colorado Right to Life. “Abortion is the intentional killing of a unique human being. No one has the fundamental right to kill innocent people and some bill put forth by Democrats doesn’t change that.”

Sponsors said they are confident they will get the measure passed this year but there may be pushback.

“We will use any legal means necessary to oppose it and fight it in court,” Duffy vowed.

Supporters said this measure is just one part of their plan to keep abortion rights in tact.

“There’s also going to eventually have to be a constitutional ballot initiative to secure it in our state constitution shall Roe fall,” Esgar said.

Sponsors said that the ballot initiative would not come until 2024. The bill is due in committee next Wednesday.