BOULDER, Colo. (KDVR) — Any parent can imagine the horror of the moment their newborn stops breathing. A Boulder County couple called 911 for help and got just that from Dispatcher Rob Schimoler.

Schimoler was given a Life Saving Award for his recent efforts, coaching the couple to help keep their infant alive. According to the sheriff’s office, Schimoler received a 911 hang-up call recently and immediately called back. The baby’s father said there was an emergency and “My baby is not breathing.”

The infant was less than four weeks old, according to the sheriff’s office. The couple lived in a remote mountain area of the county, and the baby was not conscious or breathing.

Schimoler walked the couple through infant CPR steps, as the two put the phone on speaker. Schimoler acted as the couple’s “metronome” as he counted out loud, creating a rhythm for chest compressions, according to the sheriff’s office.

After several rounds, the baby started crying.

Schimoler was on the line with the family for 14 minutes, right to the minute Coal Creek Canyon Fire arrived on scene.

“I wanted to reach out to commend your dispatch team on this morning’s one-month-old patient,” said Coal Creek Canyon Assistant Fire Chief Joe Ceurvost in a statement to Boulder County Sheriff’s Office.

“I’m not sure who was guiding the parents through infant CPR, but they certainly deserve a shout-out. The infant had just started breathing and crying on our arrival. We had a lot to do to stabilize this newborn, but it would not have been possible without the good CPR prior to our arrival. Our jobs, both in Dispatch and Fire, are challenging and we often do not achieve the patient outcomes that we would like, but the success of today’s incident makes all the training and sacrifices we endure so worth it. We were fortunate that it was our day to be heroes. Strong work!”

This isn’t the first time Schimoler has been recognized for his calm, helpful demeanor on calls. The Boulder County Sheriff’s Office acknowledged his work in helping residents evacuate during the Marshall Fire earlier this year.