Boulder County warns visitors of lack of parking at Flagstaff Mountain, Hessie Trailhead

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BOULDER COUNTY, Colo. (KDVR) — The City of Boulder and Boulder County continue to advise visitors of the lack of parking available at Flagstaff Mountain and the Hessie Trailhead near Nederland.

Those who plan to recreate in those areas over Memorial day weekend will most likely not find a parking sport.

Authorities say that more than 225 cars have been turned away on each weekend day at the Hessie check point (located at the intersection of CR 140 and CR 130) when parking was full.

They also say that visitors who ignore “no parking” signs, block emergency access gates or have any part of their tires touching the white lines on county roads may be ticketed and have their cars towed.

Additionally, Flagstaff Mountain Summit Road is currently closed.

Boulder County is also reminding visitors of the state Safer at Home order and to adhere to the following guidelines:

  • Limit recreational travel to no further than 10 miles from your residence.
  • Prohibit public gatherings of 10 or more people in public spaces.

City of Boulder and Boulder County open space rangers will issue citations for behavior that endangers the public.

Boulder County and City of Boulder continue to remind peoples to:

  • Honor the fire restrictions currently in place in western unincorporated Boulder County. This include restrictions on recreational sports shooting.
  • Always bring face coverings when visiting open space. Anyone over 12 years old is required to wear face coverings anytime they cannot maintain six feet of distance at OSMP and BCPOS trailheads and when passing others on trails.
  • Visit open space areas in groups of four or fewer people because larger groups can impede traffic on trails and make it difficult for people to maintain social distance. OSMP and BCPOS also request visitors to not gather at open space parks. Picnic tables and shelters are closed.
  • Stay on trail if no one else is around. If visitors need to maintain physical distance on narrow trails, they should step onto a rock or a bare spot – if possible – to let others pass, then step back on the trail.
  • Adhere to dog regulations for specific trails, pick up after their dogs and remove their trash.
  • Stay out of wildlife closure areas and other areas closed to the public.
  • Know their limits and not take any risks to help protect first responders.
  • Be considerate of others.

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