Estes Park woman tests positive for COVID-19 days before her 2nd Moderna vaccine dose

Coronavirus
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ESTES PARK, Colo. — (KDVR) — An Estes Park woman tested positive on Feb. 25 for COVID-19, just two days prior to her second Moderna vaccine appointment.

“Just because you have the shot doesn’t mean you are ok,” Patsy J Merry, who tested positive for COVID-19 said. 

Merry said she was exposed at her church, even though she was wearing a mask. Just a few days after the exposure, she tested positive. 

She said she had chills, she was tired and had body and headaches, but no severe symptoms. 

“I have to say the shot really did help me not have a bad case of covid,” Merry said. 

She received her first dose on Jan. 27. Merry said even with just one dose, she thinks it helped keep her symptoms mild. 

“I thank god I had my first shot before I had to deal with it,” Merry said. 

The Problem Solvers spoke to local doctors about how Merry would still test positive despite having one dose of the vaccine. 

“It’s the sars covid 2 virus you get infected with but if you get sick, like shortness of breath, cough, lose your sense of taste or smell. That’s COVID19,” Dr. David Wyles, the Chief Infectious Disease at Denver Health said. 

Dr. Wyles said you can still be exposed and infected with the virus but the vaccine stops it from progressing. 

“Even though she tested positive, you would count the vaccine as a success if she didn’t get really sick or need to go to the hospital,” Dr. Wyles said in reference to Merry’s situation. 

Dr. Richard Zane, the Chief Innovation Officer at UCHealth, said even if there is a vaccine, people still need to be wearing masks, practicing social distancing and washing hands. 

“Having a vaccine doesn’t mean you are in a plastic bubble. You can still be exposed to this virus and the virus can go in your nose and lungs. It’s the vaccine that prevents it from replicating or cause severe disease,” Dr. Zane said. 

Dr. Wyles said two weeks after the first dose you get some protection. He stated by the time you get to four weeks the protection rate jumps up to 70-80%. Seven days after the second dose you are up to 95% protected.  
 

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