Political pioneers, authors of new book talk to students at Metro State

DENVER — Four prominent African-American politicians visited the Metropolitan State University Denver campus on Thursday to encourage young people to get more involved in the political process.

Donna Brazile, Minyon Moore, Yolanda Caraway and Leah Daughtry are co-authors of the new book, "For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Politics." All have more than 30 years of experience in the political space.

Brazile is a political strategist and the former campaign manager for Al Gore's presidential run. Daughtry was the CEO of the Democratic National Convention when it was in Denver in 2008. Moore was the assistant to the president during the Clinton administration. Caraway is known for her public relations experience.

The group's visit to MSU was not about personal agendas or party lines. The women had a simple message, especially for the young people in the room.

"t’s time to get engaged, it’s time to get involved," Brazile said. “Recognize that they’re the majority of voters in this upcoming election and it’s time for them to take their seats at the table.”

“So often, people think that politics is this big, grand thing that you have to get involved in. It really is not," Moore said. "All you have to do is have a heart and willing to work and serve. And a lot of times, you have to be willing to work and serve free."

Students in the audience left with several takeaways.

“Once we do have speakers who look like us, who have aspirations like us, it’s a must for us to come out and show our faces and to learn from the best," said student Adetilewa Awosanya. “Even though they all had different opinions, they all had different candidates they were endorsing, it stood out to me.”

“Having someone say, 'No, no. It’s OK to only do an hour a week.' It was really like something I needed to hear," said DaShawna Jackson, another student.

The authors are well-known members of the Democratic party and quite vocal with their views, but they'll be the first to say all voices need to be heard.

“We just want people to be involved, no matter who you support. Just get out and be active," Caraway said.

“We say 'welcome,' and I think that if we did more listening to each other, our world would probably be far better off," Moore said.

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