Controversy of Gillette ad continues to pick up steam

DENVER -- A razor advertisement using the "Me Too" movement as inspiration continues to go viral on social media.

Gillette’s new ad campaign encourages men to serve as an example to their kids. It encourages men to keep boys from becoming bullies and to teach them to respect women.

Many applaud the effort, like Francesca Purner.

“I think calling out anybody to be a better person and step up more is never a bad thing," said Purner.

However, some men on social media say they are offended and feel the ad makes the unfair assumption that most males have a character problem. One Twitter post reads: "No thanks I’ll raise my son the way I want and his first razor definitely won't be one of yours now."

Gillette issued a statement on their website stating, "It’s time we acknowledge that brands, like ours, play a role in influencing culture.”

FOX31 paid a visit to the popular Ollie’s Barbershop in Denver's Washington Park neighborhood to discuss the ad. The owners and employees are noted for their commitment to community service. The business donates to various charities as well as local animal rescues and shelters. One barber noted that the ad seemed to have an intense message and he understands why men who are already striving to “do the right thing” may be offended.

“When it  comes to being a man, I think we know what we need to do," he said.

 A client joined the conversation, adding, “There are a lot of complaints about everything being too P.C., too sensitive. But everybody's pretty sensitive about the ad, too!”

Professional Therapist Kim Wagner of the Women’s Counseling Center of Denver tells FOX31 companies that address social issues are walking a fine line.

"Ads that are attempting to shape society in a argumentative way, someone might perceive them as (saying), ‘You're not doing things right and there's something wrong with you.' They tend not to be received as well, and I can see how in some ways for some men, they may feel that way," said Wagner.

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