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Colorado voters reject both transportation funding measures

DENVER -- Both transportation measures on the ballot were shot down by voters Tuesday.

Wednesday, it left many wondering how our state's road issues will ever get addressed. Over the years we've talked to a lot of people about their frustrations with traffic on Colorado highways.

Many of those people still have concerns today, but said propositions 109 and 110 weren't the ways to go about solving the problems.

"Well obviously not to raise taxes, or issue bonds,” When asked about a solution to Colorado's transportation issues, one voter said. “Our taxes are high enough already. I think with the influx of all the people here, we should be able to manage a budget better without raising taxes.”

“I think it probably has to do with taking on the debt," another voter said.

While both campaigns technically lost, the folks with Prop 109 and the bond measure call election night a success.

“We consider it a victory to have stopped an unnecessary tax increase from passing in Colorado," Mike Krause, a Prop 109 supporter said.

The Prop 110 campaign sent us the following statement, “We are disappointed, but obviously the voters were not in a mood to embrace either transportation solution. The transportation challenges facing Colorado remain, and attention will now turn to our new Governor and Legislature to find the right solution for our state.”

When we went to CDOT about the issues, Amy Ford with the department said, “The 'what’s next' for us is that we continue to move forward on these projects that we have started and we continue to look at the vision of what transportation is in Colorado.”

The roads in Colorado are now in the hands of lawmakers, who will have the responsibility to allocate funds for state and local roads.

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