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Eviction rate rising in Colorado, new research finds

DENVER — Rising house and rent prices across Colorado are squeezing residents out of their homes.

A research project created by Princeton University evaluated the number of evictions across counties and cities spanning the U.S.

The study shows that in Colorado, there were nearly 50 evictions across the state everyday in 2016.

That rate ratcheted above the national average by 0.41 percent. Nationally, the average is at 2.75 percent.

In 2016, there were 36,240 eviction filings among the Colorado’s 5,278,906 people.

The top three large cities with the highest eviction rates in Colorado included Aurora, Thornton and Colorado Springs.

Midsize cities with the highest eviction rates include Northglenn, Fountain and Brighton.

The small cities and rural areas with the highest rates include Aetna Estates, Hillrose and Federal Heights.

Statistics of Colorado’s eviction rates broken down by race show white people bear the brunt of the  crisis at more than 69 percent.

Hispanics fell far behind with an eviction rate percentage of about 21 percent, while rates among African-Americans totaled nearly 4 percent.

The study also showed Coloradans being forced from their homes paid a median gross rent of $1,002 or had a property value of $247,800.

The median household income for Coloradans in the study was more than $60,500.

To gauge the extreme acceleration of evictions with just one year, data show that in Colorado, eviction rates in 2015 were at 1.92 percent.

Just one year later, the percentage of residents without a home soared to 2.75 percent.

In comparison, the national average of evictions within the year dropped slightly from 2.38 percent to 2.34 percent.

(Yellow = State,  Green = County,  Blue = City, Town, Etc.)

This research uses data from The Eviction Lab at Princeton University, a project directed by Matthew Desmond and designed by Ashley Gromis, Lavar Edmonds, James Hendrickson, Katie Krywokulski, Lillian Leung, and Adam Porton. The Eviction Lab is funded by the JPB, Gates, and Ford Foundations as well as the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative. More information is found at evictionlab.org. To learn more about how the organization gathered and validated the data, visit its Methods page.

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