Skier dies after colliding with tree at Keystone Resort; snowboarder dies in Telluride backcountry

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SUMMIT COUNTY, Colo. -- It was a deadly weekend at Colorado ski resorts as a snowboarder and skier died from injuries suffered while on the slopes.

One fatality took place at Keystone Resort when a skier collided with a tree, the Summit County Sheriff's Office said.

The accident happened about 12:50 p.m. Sunday.

CPR was being performed on the skier when dispatch was notified.

The skier was taken by Keystone Ski Patrol to the Saint Anthony Keystone Medical Clinic where he was later pronounced dead.

The skier has not been identified, pending notification of next of kin. The Summit County Coroner's Office is investigating the death.

A second incident involved a backcountry snowboarder found in Bear Creek, the San Miguel Sheriff's Office said.

A rescue crew was dispatched to a report of an unresponsive, pulseless man in Telluride’s Bear Creek backcountry on Sunday afternoon.

The San Miguel County Coroner's Office identified the man as 47-year-old Gabriel Wright of Telluride.

Wright was snowboarding with two friends in the Bear Creek backcountry below Nellie Mine.

Wright, who was considered a professional-level backcountry boarder, was the third of the three to descend from Nellie Mine about 2 p.m. Sunday when he had an unwitnessed event resulting in his death, the sheriff's office said.

Evidence on scene and on his snowboard indicated he might have clipped a rock in shallow snow at a high rate of speed, was thrown forward and hit a small log under some snow.

His friends are both CPR certified and told deputies it took them 30 minutes to reach him and when they could not detect a pulse, they unsuccessfully performed CPR for at least 30 minutes.

“I would be remiss if I didn’t remind people of the dangers of venturing into the backcountry," Sheriff Bill Masters said. "We have this great white shark out there that’s a serious threat and it’s called Bear Creek."

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