Rare ‘black moon’ occurs Friday night

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DENVER — If the skies are clear Friday night, it will be a great night for stargazing thanks to a rare event called a black moon.

Usually, there is only one full moon and one new moon, or dark moon, in each lunar month. When there are two new moons in a calendar month, the second new moon is called a black moon, The Weather Channel explains.

And it is very dark. The illuminated side is facing away from Earth, making it practically invisible.

“While you can’t see the moon, it will be a great night for seeing the stars,” TWC said.

The last time there was a black moon was March 2014. Technically, it will only be a black moon for the Western Hemisphere.

The new moon occurs at 6:11 p.m. MDT Friday, so the Eastern Hemisphere’s new moon will occur on Oct. 1, according to AccuWeather.

“However, these areas will not miss out on a black moon,” AccuWeather said. “Another new moon will occur at the end of the month, giving the Eastern Hemisphere a black moon right around Halloween.”

That could make things extra spooky — or less spooky — depending on your beliefs.

There are some people who believe the black moon is a sign that the end of the world near.

And there are others who believe the exact opposite — that it is not the end but a new beginning.

“New moons tend to be regarded as an open door, a chance to begin anew, to start again, to move forward into the next phase,” according to Bustle.com. “It represents the planting of the seed, and the darkness that a seed requires before it is able to grow. This particular new moon comes jam-packed with positive vibes, particularly for Libras.”

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