Colorado Animal Sanctuary says it would have tranquilized gorilla, not killed it

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KEENESBURG, Colo. -- It is a video that has gone viral: A small boy gets into an exhibit at the Cincinnati Zoo and is dragged through the water by a gorilla, then zoo officials decide to kill the primate.

At the Wild Animal Sanctuary, several weighed in on the decision, made in a zoo hundreds of miles away.

"We didn't agree with the decision," said Pat Craig, director of the Wild Animal Sanctuary.

Craig said if someone accidentally fell into his tiger or bear exhibit, he would order a tranquilizer dart first.

"The animals don't have the instinct to kill people all the time," Craig said.

For others at the sanctuary, there disagreement. Joann Dawe brought her two young grandchildren and said if Jack Hanna believes the zoo did the right thing, then she does too.

"If we are looking at human vs. animal, I want the little boy saved," Dawe said.

The Cincinnati incident is just the latest example of humans wanting to be too close to wild animals, Craig said.

"There has definitely been a change in society of people wanting to get closer and interact with animals; you see a lot of more celebrities taking pictures with exotic animals," Craig said.

As a result of this this incident and the rise of exotic selfies, Craig said zoos and sanctuaries are rethinking fences and overall current safety designs.

"I think every zoo is going to look at it," Craig said.

But for animal enthusiasts like Minerva, they say zoos are already doing the best they can and parents must bear the responsibility.

"It's the parents' or guardians' responsibility to make sure that child does not climb over that fence," Minerva said.

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