Jimmy Carter announces he is cancer-free

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ATLANTA — Jimmy Carter’s cancer is gone, the former president announced on Sunday.

Carter, 91, revealed the news in front of a Sunday School class he was teaching at Maranatha Baptist Church in Plains, Georgia.

Stephanie Wynn, a 12-year member of the congregation, confirmed Carter’s comments to CNN. According to Wynn, Carter said he’d gone for an MRI last week, and the scan’s results showed that he is cancer-free. The congregation applauded the news, she said.

Carter announced in August that doctors had told him that four spots of cancer had spread to his brain. He said his fate “is in the hands of God, whom I worship.”

In November, Carter’s doctors at Emory University’s Winship Cancer Institute in Atlanta said his treatment had gone well — with no signs the cancer has spread.

 Carter cut back a bit from his tireless schedule, including his work at the Carter Center, Emory University and Habitat for Humanity, among others, to focus on his treatment for cancer. He continued to teach Sunday School classes and Bible talks at Maranatha as often as he could, though.

Carter, elected in 1976 and ousted in the 1980 election by Ronald Reagan, has a family history of pancreatic cancer — a disease that claimed his father, brother and two sisters. His mother had breast cancer, which later spread to her pancreas.

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