Supreme Court may finally rule on same sex marriage

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DENVER -- The Supreme Court is on the verge of making a decision about whether or not same sex marriages should be allowed in all 50 states.

That ruling is likely to come either Friday or next Monday.

Same sex marriage is already legal in 38 out of 50 states in the U.S., Colorado being one of them. What this ruling would mean is that same sex couples married in Colorado could go next door to states such as Nebraska and have their marriage legally recognized by federal law.

Just eight months after gay rights activists stood on the steps of Colorado's federal court house to declare victory in the fight for marriage equality, activists now say the real victory is just hours away.

Ryann Peyton is with Colorado's The Center. She calls the forthcoming Supreme Court decision on whether to mandate gay marriage in all 50 states a potentially historic one.

"People are ready for this," she said. "I don't think many people in our community expected to see this in their lifetime, let alone this quickly."

She also says the fight isn't finished and we saw that recently with protestors outside the Supreme Court.

Those opposed to the supreme court's intervention argue that it should be a state by state decision.

"There is still opposition to this, but I think people have seen the writing on the wall and are not contributing the funds they were contribuitng as much," said Peyton. "But those organizations out there that have taken a strong position will continue to do so."

Colorado legalized same sex marriage last year. Long thought of as a purple state, at this past weekend's Pride event, Colorado instead looked like a state of many colors.

Several people used the opportunity to marry under what is described as the country's largest wedding cake.

Many used the weekend to celebrate, but they say the bigger celebration may come as early as tomorrow.

Rallies are planned on Friday and if the decision is not handed down Friday, then on Monday, as that is the last day court is in session.

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