Damage assessment, cleanup begin after storm socks Denver; severe weather expected to return

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DENVER -- Residents and emergency crews were assessing the damage Thursday morning after a vicious storm ripped through the Denver metro area Wednesday afternoon.

Leaves were scattered across streets, lawns and vehicles, and trees were toppled in several neighborhoods, including a huge pine tree that closed East Sixth Avenue at Oneida Street.

The South Platte River and Cherry Creek flowed over their banks and inundated bike paths, and several streets flooded as the storm rolled through. At one point, rain was falling at a rate of nearly 12 inches an hour.

The search could resume Thursday morning after a person possibly fell into the South Platte River. Denver Fire water rescue teams and Adams County Fire Rescue are taking a close look at the area of East 58th Avenue and York Street.

The fast-moving, fast-rising water also caught cyclists who use the now-flooded bike path. There were a higher number of cyclists on the path Wednesday because of Bike to Work Day.

Hot and humid conditions will lead to scattered showers and thunderstorms during the late afternoon and they could be strong to severe much like Wednesday.

The tornado threat does not appear to be high, but hail and high winds are a possibility. Expect a high of close to 90 degrees.

There is a severe thunderstorm watch effective until 10 p.m. for the counties of Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Denver, Jefferson, Larimer, Logan, Morgan, Phillips, Sedgwick, Washington and Weld.

 

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