Key Lime Air cargo plane that took off from DIA crashes in Kansas; pilot OK

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A Key Lime Air plane made an emergency landing northwest of Goodland, Kan., on Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015. (Credit: Sherman County Sheriff's Office)

GRANT, Kan. — A Key Lime Air cargo plane that took off from Denver International Airport crashed northwest of Goodland, Kan., on Wednesday morning but the pilot survived, the Kansas State Patrol said.

The twin-engine plane took off from DIA just after 7 a.m. MST en route to Colby, Kan., but crashed about 9 a.m. CST about 20 miles east of the Colorado-Kansas state line.

Kansas Highway Patrol Trooper Tod Hileman said the plane was carrying UPS cargo.

The pilot was not injured but was transported to Goodland Regional Medical Center as a precaution, the Sherman County (Kan.) Sheriff’s Office said. Flight 169 was trying to reach Renner Field Goodland Municipal Airport after experiencing engine trouble.

The flight’s destination of Shalz Field in Colby was about 40 miles east of where the plane went down.

The track of Key Lime Air flight 169 en route from Denver to Colby, Kan., made an emergency landing northwest of Goodland, Kan., on Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015. (Credit: FlightAware)

The track of Key Lime Air flight 169 en route from Denver to Colby, Kan., made an emergency landing northwest of Goodland, Kan., on Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015. (Credit: FlightAware)

Englewood-based Key Lime Air said in a statement the plane experienced an engine “anomaly” during the flight and went down safely.

“Key Lime Air received confirmation that one of our twin engine cargo aircraft experienced an unexpected engine anomaly in flight. The flight was operated with a single pilot and no passengers,” the statement read. “The aircraft landed safely at an off-airport location close to Goodland, KS, without incident. There are no injuries to the pilot. Key Lime Air will be conducting a thorough examination of the aircraft in order to determine the cause of the anomaly.”

The Federal Aviation Administration has been contacted, Hileman said.

It’s the second crash of a Key Lime Air plane in less than a month.

On Dec. 30, a Key Lime Air twin-engine cargo plane crashed in a Centennial neighborhood after taking off from Centennial Airport en route to Denver International Airport. The pilot, Daniel Steitz of Englewood, was killed. Steitz was a retired Aurora Police detective sergeant.

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