Rapid warm-up causes pothole problems all over metro Denver

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DENVER -- If you were out driving Tuesday, there's a good chance you hit one. A pothole, that is.

After a two-day warm-up they started popping up all over metro Denver. The result was a lot of damaged tires.

There are so many during this intense thaw and freeze cycle that work crews are working hard to keep up with the road repairs, as you'll see in Dave Young's video report above.

The following pothole facts and figures are from the Denver Public Works Department:

  • We have filled 20 potholes so far in 2015, which is comparable to other years
  • In 2014, we filled 78,118 potholes
  • On average, we fill 60,000 to 100,000 potholes per year, so this number for 2014 is within that range
  • We expect to begin getting more pothole complaints in the coming days as we experience these freeze/thaw weather conditions
  • Our budget in 2014 for pothole repair was $2.2 million and we remained within budget
  • Between 6 and 8 patch trucks hit the streets daily, weather permitting.  Generally, there are two people on each truck. Sometimes three people if it is a bigger job and additional resources are needed in the field

Pothole repair timeframes

  • Our normal target range for response to a pothole complaint is 24-72 hours (most are filled within 48 hours, weather permitting, M-F)
  • We typically do not have a back log on potholes; 90% of the calls we get are patched within 48 hours. The vast majority we repair are proactively patched

Reporting potholes

  • Denver’s Public Works encourages citizens to report potholes via 311 and providing the closest cross streets to the pothole and any other significant information.
  • People can call 311, reach 311 online on the city’s website, and download the city’s 311 mobile app.
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