Neighbors question how long it took Boulder firefighters to arrive at fire that killed little boy

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

BOULDER, Colo.  -- Neighbors criticize firefighter response time to a Boulder fire yesterday that killed a little boy.

They say it could have made the difference in saving the child’s life. But Boulder Fire says probably nothing could have saved the little boy.

Dispatchers got the first 911 call just before 10:23 a.m. Tuesday to the Boulder Meadows Mobile Home Park in the 4900 block of 19th Street.

Firefighters arrived at about 10:31 a.m. That’s an eight-minute response time some neighbors say is too long considering a fire station is just about a block away.

Neighbor Gerardo Ibarra Sr. heard an explosion.

Then, he saw flames devour the trailer next door, as a mother of two boys--her face blackened--emerged with just one child.

“The big kid ran inside, into the fire. (He) said, ‘My brother, my brother,’ He was going to get his brother,” Ibarra says in Spanish.

Ibarra pauses as he remembers going in after the 5-year-old.

“I went in and took him out of the fire because he was going to burn. But I couldn’t get the little one out. It was too ugly already,” he says.

Ibarra and other neighbors say it took firefighters too long to get there--even though a fire station is just down the street.

“The police got here like in 3 minutes. But the firefighters, it took them 13 minutes. For that reason, the little boy died,” says Ibarra.

“It’s a firefighters worst day when we can’t save a child,” says Boulder Fire Deputy Chief Michael Calderazza.

He says that the close-by Fire Station 5 was filling in for another fire crew in Gun Barrel, who were training near Boulder Reservoir.

Other Boulder fire stations then filled in for Station 5. The nearest one at 13th and High is three miles away near the Pearl Street Mall.

Calderazza says they and three other crews arrived in less than 8 minutes.

“There’s probably next to nothing we could have done. Even if someone were right there and standing there, I’m not sure we would have had a positive outcome,” says Calderazza.

He says trailer fires burn very hot and fast—along with the furniture inside them. He also says young children are more susceptible to smoke than adults.

“It’s very sad, it’s very sad, the baby who died. It hurts my heart,” says teary neighbor, Martha Argunedo, in Spanish.

The neighbor says her heart is broken that a baby died in such a tragic way.

And why it happened is something investigators are still trying to figure out as they sift for clues in the charred remains of the home.

A cause of the fire could be announced by Monday.

Neighbors have set up a fund to help the family who lost everything.

AlertMe

7 comments

  • Bob Lawlaw

    So a crew was out of service training and the crew that is normally nearby had to help cover down.

    If they had gotten there in 3 minutes and the baby died then the neighbors would be crying that the baby died because the firefighters don’t train enough.

  • And xox

    The changes the city has made to ‘reduce the carbon footprint’ should be closely examined in this case.

  • Anonymous

    Just because they speak spanish doesnt mean they have government assistance. Dont be ignorant and disrespectful!

  • Anonymous

    Its funny that you people leave all the comments up hating the Mexicans bit when someone talks bad about the whites it s taken down fast fucked up news channel

    • LEARNTOSWIM

      Probably because we are sick of hearing Spanish spoken everywhere we go. There comes a point when enough is enough.

      • Anonymous

        Funny thing is that its not a white world like you people say………..we have taken over an we do it all not like you crazy whites all the fucked up news comes from whites

Comments are closed.