Metro Denver schools earn higher health department rankings than many fine restaurants

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DENVER -- School cafeterias in the metro area are getting higher health ratings than many fine dining restaurants.

In fact we learned that schools pass more than 95 percent of health inspections on average. It's something that is a comfort to parents.

FOX31 Denver's visit to Mountain Vista Elementary School in Centennial revealed the tough standards school cafeterias must pass.

Tri-County Public Health inspector Sherry Sun’s inspection of the kitchen included measuring the temperature of hot and cold foods, observing sanitary practices and food storage facilities.

Sun says, “Kids are a higher risk population,  their immune system is not as good as an adult and at the end of the day they are also a consumer.”

She says hot food that is on display buffet style should be kept at a temperature of at least 135 degrees.  Cold food should sit at 41 degrees or lower when not being refrigerated.

The staff practices regular hand washing, up to 20 times during the lunch service.

Sun explains that school employees often follow stricter guidelines than restaurants. “They have a lot more training from the district.”

For more information about your school cafeteria’s public health inspection visit your county’s public health website.  Here are a few  helpful links:

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1 Comment

  • MrEddd

    I worked for a year at a Cherry Creek Schools elementary school as a kitchen assistant. I was made to attend a two day seminar on food safety. Every employee of a food service establishment should be required to take this class and be certified. I have worked in and around restaurant kitchens and many of them were flat out disgusting, some well known and high priced. The three Cherry Creek schools I worked at were almost perfect.

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