Jailed pastor explains why Mennonites are a peaceful congregation

ARAPAHOE COUNTY, Colo. -- An elderly Mennonite woman remained in the Arapahoe County Jail on Saturday night.

Greta Lindecrantz has been behind bars for six days, charged with contempt of court.

A judge put her behind bars after she refused to testify in case involving the death sentence.

Lindecrantz said it went against her religious beliefs.

"A week ago she was here standing right in the middle of our church and we prayed for her," said Pastor Vern Rempel of Beloved Community Mennonite Church in Englewood.

“I don’t think anybody goes to their job and think oh this is going to result in my religious and personal freedoms being taken from me," Lindecrantz said from jail.

The 67-year-old private investigator was thrown in jail for refusing to testify in a death penalty appeals cases she had worked on as a private investigator.

“My faith doesn’t change in the face of adversity and I don’t believe that any amount of jail would ever change my faith because I don’t believe in being involved in killing of my fellow human beings," she said.

Lindecrantz believes her testimony to prosecutors could lead to the execution of convicted murderer.

But Mennonites are against any type of violence.

"For Mennonites, human beings are just as beloved by God as we are, regardless of their situation and regardless of their actions," Rempel said.

Mennonites have been a peace church for centuries, Rempel said.

“We don’t kill even in self-defense and in the same way we would not support even the legalized killing by the state with the death penalty," Rempel said.

On Saturday, members from the First Mennonite Church joined Beloved Community to pray and sing outside the Arapahoe County Jail where Lindecrantz is being held.

For now, this is all they can do. A court ruled she’ll have to stay behind bars until she testifies.

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