Doggie day care closing because of changing neighborhood, no refunds for customers who prepaid

DENVER — With construction happening on nearly every corner, the old warehouse district in Denver’s RiNo neighborhood is one of the hottest developments around.

“It went from a very industrial part of town to a very hip livable part of town,” resident David Lopert said.

But when it’s in with the new, it’s often out with the old. And that is the case for Mile High Mutts doggie day care.

“After 16 great years, we are closing Mile High Mutts due to the changing nature of the neighborhood and all it’s current and future construction,” the company’s website said.

“It’s one of the last vestiges of the old RiNo area,” Lopert said.

Lopert has been bringing his two dogs, Bear and Mini, to Mile High Mutts for about five years. He said it’s sad to see it close.

“It used to be once a week we’d take them there,” he said. “They’d get all their energy worked out of them and the rest of the week they’d be pretty mellow.”

His dogs were such regulars, Lopert purchased about $400 worth of credit to use at the day care in the future.

The menu inside the day care states, “All packages never expire, are fully refundable and never get used unless your dog is here.”

“That’s part of the reason we went there,” he said.

Lopert said he understands the business’ decision to close, but he does not understand the decision to now rescind the refund policy.

The business will close on Feb. 23.

“Any packages will need to be used in that time,” the company said in an email to customers.

“I was shocked because their policy has always been they would give refunds and all credits never expire,” Lopert said.

According to the policy, Lopert will lose about $400 worth of credit he can’t use before the deadline.

“[Mini] is recovering from ACL surgery and can’t play with other dogs for a few months,” he said.

Lopert said he has tried to contact the day care and the owner but has been unsuccessful in getting a refund.

“And it’s not just us. I would assume most people there have a credit balance and you multiply that against, I would guess, several hundred dogs. That’s thousands of dollars,” he said.

Owner Marcus Newell said he is trying to work with pet owners to find the best solution for each customer.

Details beyond that were not immediately available. Newell said he will also be sending an updated email to customers explaining more about honoring store credits.

“It’s mainly about doing the right thing. You had this policy, you should honor it,” Lopert said.