Supreme Court to hear case of Lakewood baker refusing to make cake for gay wedding

WASHINGTON -- It is a legal battle that began more than five years ago when Denver residents David Mullins and Charlie Craig went into a Lakewood bakery to look for a wedding cake and were denied because of the baker’s religious beliefs.

On Tuesday, the case will be heard in front of the U.S. Supreme Court.

“It’s really big to be going to the Supreme Court. It’s a lot of weight on your shoulders,” David Mullins said.

“I think it’s important for people to understand this is a big deal not just for gay people, but for many groups who have been historically discriminated against."

The nationally watched case will have huge implications for businesses across the country.

On the other side is baker Jack Phillips, who said he would serve Mullins and Craig any dessert, but he can’t serve a wedding cake because of his religious beliefs.

“Discrimination would be the wrong use of the word because this is just declining to make a cake for an event that goes against my faith,” Phillips said in June.

“What’s at stake here is the freedom of all artists and creative professionals to work with their consistent beliefs," said Phillips’ lawyer, Jim Campbell with Alliance Defending Freedom.

“This is not discrimination. He serves everyone, but he cannot create cakes that promote events that conflict with his beliefs."

The ACLU and the state of Colorado will argue on behalf of the couple. The federal government and the ADF will argue on behalf of the baker.

Oral arguments are slated for 8 a.m. MST Tuesday and are expected to go a little more than an hour.

Dozens of people from across the country have traveled to Washington for the case. Many waited outside the Supreme Court on Monday night hoping for access.