Adams County residents furious Broomfield leaders want to put oil and gas sites in their backyards

BROOMFIELD, Colo. — Call it a different kind of border war.

On Tuesday night, Broomfield officials are expected to approve a request from Extraction Oil and Gas to build 49 well sites near West 156th  Avenue and Huron Avenue.

The project impacts very few Broomfield homes, but that is not the case when it comes to Adams County homes.

“I believe they are sacrificing my neighborhood,” said Barbara Binder, an Adams County resident.

Binder is furious because her house, in unincorporated Adams County, will be a short distance from a proposed oil and gas site.

She believes Broomfield officials deliberately picked that land because it would be far away from Broomfield homes.

“Many of the people along here are on water wells they are frightened about their water supply,” Binder said.

But Mayor Pro Tem Greg Stokes said that couldn’t be further from the truth. Stokes is expected to vote for the project.

“We were looking out for the health and safety of human beings regardless of where they lived,” Stokes said.

Stokes said the land was chosen because that is what Extraction identified in addition to the fact that site satisfied the health and safety requirements set forth by a recent commission.

“I’m actually kinda pleased we were able to achieve a 1,000-foot setback. I don’t think Adams County currently has that in their regulations,” Stokes said.

Stokes said also other well pads will be shut down as a result of this compromise.

The latest oil and gas controversy in Broomfield comes in the midst of election season, where a controversial measure is being debated.

Broomfield 301 would require Broomfield officials to take into health and safety considerations before approving any new sites.

On Tuesday, Broomfield 301 supporters aligned with Adams County residents such as Binder to show solidarity.

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