Denver among 32 host city candidates for 2026 FIFA World Cup

NEW YORK — Denver is one of the 32 cities across North America that could host games in the 2026 FIFA World Cup, The United Bid Committee announced Wednesday.

The United Bid Committee whittled the list from an initial 41 applicants across the United States, Canada and Mexico. The potential host cities include four in Canada, three in Mexico, and 25 in the United States.

“The 32 cities that we have identified as potential host cities, on their own and together, are prepared to welcome soccer fans from around the world,” said John Kristick, executive director of the United Bid Committee.

“They are more than capable of helping fulfill the shared vision and ambition of FIFA and the United Bid in shaping the future of soccer in North America.”

U.S. soccer considers various factors such as city profile, stadium and support facilities, and services such as transportation. The organization said Denver and the other cities have the infrastructure required by FIFA to host the World Cup.

Sports Authority Field at Mile High would be Denver’s host stadium, WorldSoccerTalk.com reported.

The United Bid Committee said nonhost cities will be considered for such tasks as being possible locations for team base camps or other noncompetition-related events leading up to the tournament.

Representatives from the 32 cities will travel to Houston on Nov. 13 to determine how to go forward with the bid. The final bid is due to FIFA by March 16 and will have 20 to 25 stadiums. At least 12 locations could host the games.

FIFA is expected to select the winning bid in June.

The full list of cities being considered.

Canada

Edmonton, Alberta
Montreal
Toronto
Vancouver, British Columbia

Mexico

Guadalajara
Mexico City
Monterrey

United States

Atlanta
Baltimore
Boston
Charlotte, North Carolina
Cincinnati
Chicago
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
Houston
Kansas City, Missouri
Las Vegas
Los Angeles
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville, Tennessee
New York/New Jersey
Orlando, Florida
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Salt Lake City
San Francisco Bay Area
Seattle
Tampa, Florida
Washington

The World Cup last came to North America in 1994 when the U.S. hosted