Bump stocks disappear from Colorado store shelves

DENVER -- Gun enthusiasts across Colorado have been rushing to buy bump stocks, according to Denver-area gun store employees.

The bump stock is the same device that allowed a Nevada man to shoot hundreds of people in Las Vegas -- marking the deadliest shooting in modern U.S. history.

The demand for the accessory comes as federal lawmakers consider outlawing the device and the National Rifle Association says it’s open to regulation.

Bump stocks offer a legal and inexpensive way for someone to convert a semiautomatic gun into an automatic gun. Automatic guns are extremely expensive and difficult to buy, and illegal, according to experts.

A video, produced by GunsAmerica, shows how quickly bullets fly with the help of a bump stock.

The device, costing just less than $100, pushes a gun that shoots 120 rounds per minute to 800 rounds per minute.

“It allows you to fire a gun -- I don’t think particularly accurately -- but maybe just a little bit more rapidly,” said Denver-area gun store manager Richard Taylor.

Gun store managers along the Front Range said they have been receiving many requests for the bump stock out of fear the product might soon become illegal.

Gun store clerks said most people use the bump stocks for fun during target practices.

Once the accessory is installed, the stock uses the recoil motion pulling the gun back and forth allowing for rapid fire.

Bump stocks could not be found at Walmart or Cabela’s stores on Thursday.