Another immigrant takes sanctuary in Denver church

DENVER -- From possible pardons to government shutdowns, President Donald Trump intensified the debate over immigration on Tuesday night in Phoenix.

"If we have to close down our government, we are building a wall," Trump told the crowd at his campaign-style rally.

The speech came as three major and controversial decisions with immigration will be made in the next six weeks.

The first is whether to pardon former Maricopa County (Arizona) Sheriff Joe Arpaio, who was convicted of failing to follow a judge's order to stop detaining suspected undocumented immigrants.

That decision could come this week.

The second is whether Trump will continue the deferred action for childhood arrivals program, which started under President Barack Obama and allows immigrants who came to the U.S. as children to stay in the country.

Ten attorneys general from around the country are threatening to sue if Trump doesn't shut down the program by Sept. 5.

If he doesn't shut it down, Trump might be forced to defend the program in court, a political position some argue is doubtful.

The third major decision is expected by the end of September.

Congress needs to pass a measure if the government is to stay open past Sept. 30. The president has indicated he wants border wall funding to be included in the spending package.

"President Trump represents hate and devision," said Jeanette Vizquerra, an immigrant who faced deportation earlier this year.

Vizquerra attended an interfaith service Wednesday as Araceli Velasquez took sanctuary at Temple Micah and Park Hill United Methodist Church.

Vizquerra is at least the fourth immigrant to take sanctuary in a Colorado church since the beginning of the Trump administration.

"The future is broken," Vizquerra said, speaking about the immigration rhetoric of Trump.