Denver museum offers discount for donation of eclipse glasses

DENVER — On the morning after the Great American Eclipse, many might be wondering what to do with eclipse glasses that were so highly coveted on Monday, but now won’t be useful for years.

There are a few things to note for those who would like to donate, reuse or recycle them.

NASA said that if the glasses are compliant with the ISO 12312-2 safety standard, they can be used for the next eclipse that covers part of the U.S. in 2024.

Just make sure the filters or lenses aren’t scratched, punctured or torn.

NASA said some glasses are printed with warnings that you shouldn’t look through them for more than three minutes at a time and that they should be discarded after three years.

NASA said those warnings are outdated and as long as they are compliant with the ISO 12312-2 standard, they are fine.

If you don’t think you’ll want to keep the glasses around for seven years or you won’t be able to find them, there are a few things that can be done.

First, they can be donated to Astronomers Without Borders, a group that helps astronomers in other parts of the world.

The Denver Museum of Nature and Science will be collecting eclipse glasses through Sept. 30.

The glasses will be sent to Astronomers Without Borders and redistributed to school children in Asia and South America for the 2019 solar eclipses.

The museum will collect glasses at its ticketing counter and is offering $2 off general admission for each pair of glasses recycled.

The next eclipses will be in South America in 2019 and 2020.  Astronomers Without Borders said it will be coordinating larger collection efforts soon.

The cardboard of the glasses can be recycled by removing the lenses.

And some entrepreneurs are still cashing in on the eclipse by selling them on Craigslist as “gently used” or as collectible items used in an historic event.