Man sentenced to 96 years for crash that killed single mother

GOLDEN, Colo. -- A man convicted of crashing a stolen truck into another vehicle, killing a young mother, will spend the rest of his life in prison.

Patrick Engle was trying to get away from Westminster police officers during a pursuit last year when he killed Jessica Holman on March 8, 2016.

During sentencing on Thursday, Jefferson County District Court Judge Dennis Hall told Engle he is incapable of rehabilitation and sentenced him to 96 years in prison.

Engle, known to police since the age of 12, has been labeled a habitual offender by the court system.

He caused a crash along Wadsworth Boulevard in Westminster, ending the life of Holman, a 33-year-old single mother.

“[Jessica has] been with us on this journey,” her mother Terry Holman said. “I think she was just waiting for this day to finish, and now we can let go.”

Engle was found guilty on multiple felony counts. He stole a pickup truck while on probation. He was with another man while speeding away from police before crossing a median and slamming into Holman's vehicle.

“The disregard for human life, the disregard for anybody but himself -- that’s kind of how I see him,” said Mark Holman, Jessica’s father.

In court on Thursday, Hall did not mince words while handing down the 96-year prison sentence. He told the felon he is incapable of rehabilitation.

Hall noted the career criminal was previously given second chances but has never been able to turn his life around. Engle has seven previous felony convictions.

“I wouldn’t want anybody to go through what we’ve gone through,” Terry said.

Family members, reading victim impact statements, said their lives will never be the same. They said the sentencing helps them down their long road toward closure.

“This is a tragic reminder that we always need to part on good ways -- tell each other that we love each other,” Holman's brother Jacobe Holman said. “You don’t know when the last time is.”

Engle’s accomplice, Ignacio Daigle, was sentenced in February to nine years in prison.

Various police agencies across the country have strict policies requiring pursuits be terminated when a chase becomes too dangerous.

The Westminster Police Department said Holman's case has not prompted a change to pursuit policies.