New ‘Forever’ stamp changes image with touch of a thumb

WASHINGTON — Two unique “Forever” stamps will be released by the United States Postal Service to commemorate two special events.

An upcoming notable stamp is a first-of-its-kind, changing color when it’s touched.

The “Total Eclipse of the Sun” Forever stamp, which commemorates the Aug. 21 eclipse, transforms into an image of the Moon with the heat of a finger.

Using the body heat of a thumb or fingers and rubbing the eclipse image will reveal an underlying image of the moon.

The back of the stamp provides a map of the eclipse path and times it might appear in some locations.

The stamp image is a photograph taken by astrophysicist Fred Espenak, aka Mr. Eclipse, that shows a total solar eclipse seen from Jalu, Libya, on March 29, 2006.

A total eclipse of the sun occurs when the moon completely blocks the visible solar disk from view, casting a shadow on Earth.

The second stamp features President John F. Kennedy, released to honor what would have been the 100th birthday of America’s 35th president.

Kennedy was born May 29, 1917 and the stamp features a 1960 photograph by Ted Spiegel of Kennedy campaigning for president in Seattle.

Postmaster General Megan J. Brennan said the stamp is a nod to the president’s spirit of public service

“He dignified and gave voice to the pride in serving the nation that every postal employee feels,” Brennan said. “It is for this reason that the Postal Service takes special pride in honoring President Kennedy.”

Kennedy was assassinated Nov. 22, 1963, in Dallas. His death at age 46 left the nation in shock.

Both stamps are “Forever” stamps, which are always equal in value to the current first-class mail 1-ounce price.