Colorado State Patrol sees success with ‘Move Over’ campaign

DENVER -- Colorado State Patrol troopers continued their "Move Over" campaign as Colorado Department of Transportation workers, who have died on the job, were remembered Wednesday during a ceremony in Denver.

The recent enforcement and education campaign started after trooper Cody Donahue was hit and killed along Interstate 25 near Castle Rock in November.

Since then, more than 1,000 people have been pulled over, accused of violating the move over law.

"We want people to understand what the law is, if they don't have an understanding," trooper Josh Lewis said.

Ignorance to the law can lead to deadly situations and tremendous grief. Donahue left behind a wife and two young daughters.

First responders were recognized at the ceremony honoring state transportation workers who have been killed on the job.

"I know probably 10 of the individuals that are listed, personally," CDOT employee Beth Carlberg said.

Statistics show one work zone fatality occurs nationwide every 15 hours. State leaders said they are trying to bring that number to zero.

"The big thing is give us a break," Lewis said. "Move over."

By law, drivers are required to move over at least one lane when construction and emergency crews are working on roadways.

Lewis said the move over campaign is working. Several months after Donahue was killed, more than 25 police agencies joined forces on Operation Move Over.

The one-day effort led to dozens of citations and hundreds of warnings issued to drivers. The enforcement continues on a daily basis.

"People are starting to understand what the law is -- that it exists, period, and we'll see that on the road," Lewis said.

But there's still more work to do, according to Lewis. That work will continue Thursday when there will be another statewide move over operation. Drivers will be watched closely for violations.

Statistics released by the Colorado State Patrol on Thursday show, as of April 13, more than 2,300 "move over" citations were issued since Donahue's death. That number is more than twice the amount of "move over" citations issued by troopers during the same time period a year earlier.