New York Times journalist apologizes for calling first lady Melania Trump ‘a hooker’

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WASHINGTON — New York Times journalist Jacob Bernstein is publicly apologizing on Twitter for remarks he made regarding first lady Melania Trump in a private conversation with model and actress Emily Ratajkowski.

“Sat next to a journalist from the NYT last night who told me ‘Melania is a hooker.’ Whatever your politics it’s crucial to call this out for what it is: slut shaming. I don’t care about her nudes or sexual history and no one should,” Ratajkowski wrote in a series of tweets Monday.

Ratajkowski, who catapulted to stardom following her semi-nude appearance in the “Blurred Lines” music video and as Ben Affleck’s student-turned-lover in the movie “Gone Girl,” actively campaigned for Bernie Sanders during the 2016 primary.

While she tweets frequently about Democratic issues, she also speaks out about women’s issues, weighing in on nudity in an interview with InStyle UK in 2015.

“‘It’s weird to me that the reaction to a woman’s naked body is so controversial in our culture. My mum taught me to never apologise for my sexuality. My dad never made me feel embarrassed. I also don’t think I’ve ever had an awareness of my own body as being super-sexual. It was always just my body,” she said.

“Gender specific attacks are disgusting sexist bull****,” she tweeted Monday.

The first lady took to Twitter herself Monday evening to thank Ratajkowski for her display of girl power.

Bernstein, who writes features for the Times, is the son of former Washington Post reporter Carl Bernstein and the late Nora Ephron. He made a documentary about his mother’s career, “Everything is Copy,” which aired on HBO last year.

While she has not yet defined her platform as she settles into her new role as first lady, Trump has said advocating for women and speaking out against cyberbullying are top priorities.

The Times reprimanded Bernstein for the comment without identifying him.

“At a party last night, a Times reporter who does not cover Washington or politics, referred to an unfounded rumor regarding Melania Trump,” a spokeswoman for the Times said in a statement.

“The comment was not intended to be public, but it was nonetheless completely inappropriate and should not have occurred. Editors have talked to the reporter in question about the lapse.”