Body language expert tips to get out of a traffic ticket

BOULDER, Colo. -- Getting a traffic ticket can mean a chunk out of your wallet, points against your driver's license, even time in jail.

But you could get out of a traffic ticket by following some very simple rules.

Traci Brown, a body language expert, said interaction with an officer can save time and money.

“You see the red lights. You get a sense of dread. Here it comes. And there’s nothing you can do about it,” Alex Hearn of Boulder said.

At least that’s what he thought before he met body language expert Traci Brown.

"I am living proof that body language can get you out of a ticket," she said. "I’ve helped hundreds of people get out of tickets."

Herself included. She said she has used her own tips to avoid eight tickets in the past three years.

It’s also helped Hearn.

"It makes a tangible difference every time I have an interaction like that, like once a year I get pulled over," he said.

Here's Brown's first tip: "Keep your hands on the steering wheel. Roll the window down. Roll the back window down," she said.

She also said turn on the dome light if it's dark so officers can see inside and that you're not a threat.

"Cops don't know who they've pulled over. They have to think you are the last mass murderer that is on the wanted list. They don’t know if your back seat is full of guns and weapons of mass destruction," she said.

Then, be aware of the tone and tempo of your voice. Be calm, easy-going and respectful. Doing the opposite will guarantee a ticket.

"You're totally going to lose and they are going to delight in finding that taillight is out or there's a crack in your windshield. They are going to take you to the mat and you are not going to win," she said.

You'll also want to ask the officer if you can retrieve your driver's license and registration from your wallet and glove box. If you're rummaging around for it before he arrives, he thinks you could be looking for gun.

"Do the things that make you seem safe. And they know you respect them if your hands are up here and you are not moving," she said.

Hearn agrees the biggest thing is defusing a sometimes prickly situation.

"They ask you for your license, registration and they half expect you to argue with them. 'Why'd you pull me over?' Here it is. Whatever you need. I treat them like I'd like to be treated," he said.

But Brown said the best way to get out of a ticket is to not get one in the first place.

"This is Plan B. Plan A is not doing anything wrong," she said.

We are also told if you politely ask for a warning, you might get it.

And never say: "My tax dollars pay your salary" or "Don't you have anything better to do?" or "Shouldn't you be out catching real criminals?"

Police have heard them all before.

Simple traffic stops can lead to the arrest of people with felony warrants.

Also, Brown has a placard that lays out the steps to get out of a ticket you can keep in your car visor at her website.