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Celebrating National Martini Day

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CR Ike from Bar Louie shows us how to make a few martinis.
THE MARTINEZ - Late 19th Century
Adapted from O.H. Byron’s Modern Bartender’s Guide, 1884
Ingredients:
1 oz. Noilly Prat Sweet Vermouth
1 oz. Hendricks Gin
2 Dashes Angostura Bitters
2 Dashes Grand Marnier
Preparation: Stir all ingredients with ice to chill and strain into a cocktail glass.
Garnish with lemon zest by releasing the oils over the top and dropping it into the drink.
Claimed to have originated in the California town bearing the same name, the Martinez is arguably the world’s first martini. In Byron’s book, it was nothing
more than a footnote under two Manhattan recipes, instructing, “Martinez, Same as Manhattan, only you substitute gin for whisky”. This is the first known
pairing of gin and vermouth, the combination that came to define the martini as we know it today.
THE KNICKERBOCKER - Circa 1911
Ingredients:
1.5 oz. Bombay Sapphire Gin
1.5 oz. Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth
Dash Orange Bitters
Dash Angostura Bitters
Preparation: Stir all ingredients with ice to chill and strain into a cocktail glass.
Garnish with an orange zest by releasing the oils over the top and dropping it into the drink.
The Knickerbocker Hotel was completed in 1906 by John Jacob Astor IV, who later perished on the Titanic. The hotel is celebrated as the home of the dry
Martini, invented by the head barman Marini Di Arma Di Taggia with half gin, half vermouth and a dash of orange bitters.
DALE’S SECOND CHANCE MARTINI – Modern Day A new millennium adaptation of the James Bond Vesper Martini.
Ingredients:
1 oz. Ketel One Vodka
1 oz. Bombay Sapphire Gin
0.25 oz. Lillet Blanc
0.25 oz. Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth
Preparation: Stir all ingredients with ice to chill and strain into a cocktail glass.
Garnish with a lemon zest by releasing the oils over the top and dropping it into the drink.
In Casino Royale James Bond shares the eponymous Vesper Martini with the woman for whom he is ready to leave Her Majesty’s Service. She betrays him,
but not before falling deeply in love. She sacrifices herself to allow Bond to escape and he is never serious with a woman again, and also never again orders
the Vesper Martini. Dale Degroff’s modern adaptation for Bar Louie creates a new chapter in this saga; a new chance for Bond to fall in love and a second
chance to make a Martini the proper way--stirred not shaken.