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First discovery of dinosaur lovemaking in the world made in Morrison, Colorado

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DENVER -- Since the discovery of dinosaurian in 1763, a lot has been learned about the giant beasts.  What they ate, where they lived, and now according to paleontologist and Colorado University Denver professor Martin Lockley, how they loved.

On a scale of one to ten, the good doctor rates the discovery an eleven, “Because it’s the first actual physical evidence of dinosaurs displaying to one another in the breeding season,” Lockley said.

High atop Dinosaur Ridge in Morrison, the good doctor showed us his evidence.

Deep, prehistoric claw marks about five feet long and three feet wide and are called "scrapes."

Scrape is another word for nest building. “But these were not building nests. They were making lots of scrapes to show their mates, their prospective mates, how they could build a nest. It’s part of their mating ritual.”

The doc said the scrapes fill in a missing gap in dinosaur foreplay. “The gap is what’s happening at the beginning of the breeding season.”  In other words, what the dinosaurs did ... before they did it.

The  physical evidence of prehistoric foreplay offers a tantalizing clue that dinos in heat were in Morrison to do … well, you know what. “It was a very frenzied activity. They get really emotionally excited.”

It’s the first discovery of dino lovemaking evidence in the world, said Lockley.

It adds a whole new meaning to the term "Mile High Club."