Voices for Warriors program gives veterans new hope, direction

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DENVER -- Being hit by three explosions in Iraq left retired Marine Chad Ritter with post traumatic stress disorder and other health problems that prevent him from working a traditional job.

“If I was a customer service representative and I  had a lot of people coming at me with problems I might (have) some anxiety," he said.

The Warrior Voices program offers Ritter a solution.  He can earn money doing professional voice work on his own.

The Warrior Voices website links veterans with businesses  and organizations that need announcers for advertising, audio books and other projects.  Vets receive free training and equipment.  Businesses can post for free.

Navy veteran Jeff McCollough is finding success with the program and has some definite career goals.

“Who doesn't want to sound like Sam Elliott or do those commercials like  Morgan Freeman," he said.

Founder Robert Reece said the main goal is to address an important need.

“We all say ‘thank you for your service’ and they appreciate that … but what they really want is an opportunity," he said.

The Warrior Voices program offers more of a benefit than just money. Many veterans will say that with all they face out there on the battlefield, once they come home it's a whole different fight, one against loneliness.

“When we come out of a military experience you don't feel important anymore,  your job is done, when you're working with Warrior Voices you get a job and complete a job and it's like ‘man I completed that,'" Ritter said.

There are still challenges.

“Put me in combat,  that's something I'm comfortable with,  take me outside of my element I'm a little more uncomfortable,”  Ritter said.

Ritter is doing just fine, so keep an ear out for him  and all of the other veterans who are making their voices heard.

Businesses earn tax credits by hiring veterans for voice work, veterans get the first $10,000 they earn tax free.