Fishing line used to smuggle McDonald’s into prison

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Prisoner behind bars in jail. (Photo: CNN)

LONDON — From drones to carrier pigeons, criminals use all kinds of ingenious methods to smuggle contraband into prison.

However, a British couple have gone back to basics and been convicted for trying to smuggle prohibited items using a fishing line and wash bag.

The pair attempted to smuggle cannabis, cocaine and a 5-inch blade, as well as a McDonald’s McMuffin and a Kinder Surprise Egg containing SIM cards into Wormwood Scrubs prison in London, England.

The man and woman were spotted last October by staff at the prison acting suspiciously on Artillery Lane, which runs adjacent to the prison.

When police searched the home of the couple, they also found the box for a Smartwatch mobile phone, which had the same serial number as a Smartwatch found inside the Wormwood Scrubs jail.

Detective Constable Andy Griffin of Hammersmith and Fulham CID said in a press release: The couple “tried to smuggle prohibited items including drugs, alcohol and a knife inside a prison; the combination could have been deadly.

“Thankfully vigilant prison staff foiled the plot and they were quickly arrested. This case serves as a strong reminder of the very serious consequences of smuggling prohibited goods into a prison.”

Karl Jensen, 27, of St. Ervans Road, North Kensington, London was sentenced to two-and-a-half years’ imprisonment after pleading guilty to seven charges of wrongdoing. His 26-year-old girlfriend Lisa Mary Hutchinson was sentenced to a 12-month community order and will take part in a community rehabilitation program, after pleading guilty to allowing her premises to be used for the supply of drugs.

“People use all sorts of different methods to smuggle prohibited items into prisons,” said Callum Gale, Operations Manager at JG Environmental, a firm which specializes in contraband and prison netting installation.

“I’ve heard of drones being used before, but not a lot. To be honest the most common method I’ve heard of smuggling drugs into prisons is by stuffing them into tennis balls and hitting them over,” he said.