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Broncos warn ticket buyers for Green Bay game to guard against scams

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DENVER -- Ticket demand, and prices, are soaring for the Broncos game Sunday night against the Green Bay Packers.

According to the Broncos ticket office, it's one of the toughest tickets for a regular-season game in recent team history. The phones have been ringing constantly this week with fans asking for tickets.

"Unfortunately, you have to tell a lot of people no, but the phone calls keep coming in," said Kirk Dyer, executive director of ticket operations.

"I don't even want to know what they're going for because I could probably sell my tickets and pay for next season's tickets for me from this one game," season ticket holder Chris Asmann said.

According to season ticket holder Eric Ruth, that might not be far off.

"For this game coming up against the Packers ... (I've been offered) around a thousand, per seat," Ruth said. "Row three, south stands."

On Tuesday, Dyer said the Packers are not returning any of the their tickets, eliminating the chance any additional tickets will be made available at face value. The team also issued a warning to fans who are looking to find tickets on the secondary market.

The Broncos only advocate fans shop on the NFL Ticket Exchange because it is the only site that guarantees each ticket sold. Other sites such as StubHub.com also offer guarantees, which generally include a refund if something goes wrong.

But shopping with peace of mind has its price. The cheapest ticket in the upper deck will cost nearly $340 on the NFL Ticket Exchange, and that's before a 10 percent to 15 percent fee. The most expensive ticket is going for more than $3,000.

Still, Dyer says it's better to pay up front than to pay for a bad ticket.

"If you don't know the person you're buying those tickets from, you're taking a chance," Dyer said.