Netanyahu: Israel-U.S. ‘friendship will weather the current disagreement’

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Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said the U.S.-Israeli relationship remains strong and, despite controversy surrounding his address to Congress, the nations "will weather this storm."

WASHINGTON — Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu struck a conciliatory tone on Monday, reaffirming the U.S.-Israeli relationship remains strong and, despite controversy surrounding his Tuesday address to Congress, the two nations “will weather this storm.”

“Our friendship will weather the current disagreement as well, to grow even stronger in the future — because we share the same dreams…because the values that unite us are much stronger than the differences that divide us,” he said in his address to the American Israel Public Affairs Committee annual policy conference, drawing enthusiastic applause from the crowd.

Polling has shown Americans disapprove of House Speaker John Boehner’s move to invite Netanyahu to speak to Congress without notifying the White House. That, and the timing of the speech so close to the Israeli election, has critics accusing Boehner and Netanyahu of politicizing the issue of Iranian nuclear talks, and a growing number of Democrats are planning to boycott what they see as an attack on the president.

But in his address to AIPAC, the prime minister refuted those critics, insisting that his Tuesday speech is “not intended to inject Israel into the American partisan debate,” and reaffirming his support for President Barack Obama.

“My speech is not intended to show any disrespect to Obama or the esteemed office that he holds—I have great respect for both,” he said.

Netanyahu instead framed his Tuesday address as part of a “moral obligation” to sound the alarm on Iran, which he warned has “vowed to annihilate Israel, and if develops nuclear weapons, it can achieve that goal.”

“As prime minister of Israel, I have a moral obligation to speak up in the face of these threats while there is time to avert them,” he said.

While he’ll face a more skeptical audience on Tuesday, Netanyahu’s speech Monday was punctuated with enthusiastic applause and multiple standing ovations from an auditorium packed with thousands of pro-Israel activists, business leaders and others in town for the annual AIPAC policy conference.

Netanyahu is expected to use his Tuesday speech to lay out what he believes are the emerging contours of a deal with Iran and warn Congress against accepting a bad deal, and to push for tougher sanctions.

Last week top White House officials warned the way it’s been handled has damaged ties between the two nations. President Obama has declined to meet with Netanyahu during his visit, and will not be attending the speech.

Netanyahu acknowledged during his Monday address that disagreements between the U.S. and Israel are “only natural from time to time,” because there are “important differences” between the two nations.

He said that Israel exists in a far more dangerous region of the world, and while “America’s the strongest power in the world, Israel is strong, but it’s much more vulnerable.”

But on Monday, United Nations Ambassador Samantha Power, speaking just before Netanyahu, reaffirmed the U.S’ commitment to a strong alliance with Israel.

“We believe firmly that Israel’s security and the U.S.- Israel partnership transcends politics. It always will,” Power said. “This partnership should never be politicized and it cannot and will not be tarnished or broken.”

Power insisted that the “bond between the United States and Israel is still a national commitment,” and declared that relationship “should never be a partisan matter.”

“We cannot and we will not lose sight of that,” she said.

AIPAC activists will fan out across Capitol Hill on Tuesday to lobby legislators to support a bill slapping tougher sanctions on Iran and one subjecting any eventual deal to congressional approval.

Because of the increasingly tense atmosphere surrounding the speech, it risks backfiring on Netanyahu, and even some of his allies have expressed concerns that he may ultimately undermine his cause.

AIPAC CEO Howard Kohr acknowledged Sunday that “the way this speech has come about has created a great deal of upset among Democrats,” but said the situation hasn’t risen to the level of a crisis yet, and “frankly, it’s up to us to not let it become a crisis.

He said the speech would be “important,” and added that “we hope and urge members of Congress to be there to hear what he has to say.”