Maryland governor saves state’s last four death row inmates from execution

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(Credit: Gov. Martin O'Malley Twitter)

ANNAPOLIS, Maryland — Outgoing Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley took the state’s last four inmates off death row Wednesday, commuting their sentences to life in prison without parole in one of his final acts in office.

The move comes as the Democrat considers a run for president — a long-shot bid that many Democrats only expect to gain steam if Hillary Clinton opts not to run.

O’Malley’s office announced the move in a release Wednesday morning, noting that the state’s legislature had abolished the death penalty with a law that took effect in May 2013 and that the state’s courts and attorney general have questioned whether the state has legal authority to carry out death sentences that were already imposed.

“In the final analysis, there is one truth that stands between and before all of us,” O’Malley said in a statement. “That truth is this — few of us would ever wish for our children or grandchildren to kill another human being or to take part in the killing of another human being. The legislature has expressed this truth by abolishing the death penalty in Maryland.”

The four inmates whose sentences were commuted are Vernon Lee Evans Jr. and Anthony Grandison Sr., who were convicted of the 1983 contract killing of two witnesses scheduled to testify in a federal drug trial; Heath William Burch, convicted of killing an elderly neighbor couple in 1995; and Jody Lee Miles, convicted of robbing and shooting a theater manager in 1997.

O’Malley said in the statement that he’d met with the families of the victims of the four convicted killers whose sentences he commuted, and said they would suffer through “the additional torment of an un-ending legal process.”

“In my judgment, leaving these death sentences in place does not serve the public good of the people of Maryland — present or future,” O’Malley said.

“Gubernatorial inaction — at this point in the legal process — would, in my judgment, needlessly and callously subject survivors, and the people of Maryland, to the ordeal of an endless appeals process, with unpredictable twists and turns, and without any hope of finality or closure,” he said.