Staying warm in these sub-zero temperatures

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DENVER -- The current cold snap is leading to more visits to Denver emergency rooms.

According to Denver Health, there has been an increase injuries from slips and falls on the ice along with injuries from frostbite.

When venturing outside in the cold, Will Viilo, of Denver, was happy to scrape the ice off his car, rather than walk on the icy sidewalk.

"Yeah, I ate it a couple times pretty good,” Viilo said. “Right in the cross walk."

Though Viilo can laugh about his falls, emergency rooms have seen much more serious slips and falls. It's something not lost on Suez Jacobson, who decided to opt for skis over running shoes at Wash Park.

"The trick is to move, to get warm,” Jacobson, said. "I'm warmer now than I have been all day."

Doctors say there's nothing wrong with a little exercise outside, as long as you dress appropriately.

Eighteen year old Isabella Goguen doesn’t believe that message pertains to her.
"I'm the one who walks to school in shorts and a tank top," she said with a laugh.

Goguen spent part of her morning shoveling her neighbors sidewalk without a hat, gloves or a jacket. Doctor Rafer Leach warns that kind of dress can be dangerous, no matter how brave you feel.

"Frost nip is something I think a lot of people experience and they get a little bit of numbness and tingling and they go indoors and they warm up, but it's a fine line between that and frost bite. You can get some irreversible damage," Dr. Leach said.

In addition to the ice and cold, the act of shoveling can also lead to a big health concern for older adults and people with heart conditions.

"That's just a major exertional force,” Dr. Leach said. “I mean that's boot camp. People just don't realize it because they clump it in with their regular household chores, but it's not. It's a brutal workout."

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