Public’s input sought on ways to fix Denver Sheriff’s Department

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

DENVER -- The city of Denver wants the public's input to help make changes to the troubled Denver Sheriff's Department.

The city is seeking input about department policies, discipline, training, staff well-being and characteristics in the next sheriff.

The first of four community meetings will be a Manual High School on Sept. 6. The city also set up a website,  And input can be submitted via email at

Trouble in the Sheriff's Department came to light after surveillance video showed issues with inmates. Inmate Jamal Hunter recently sued after he says a deputy chocked him and another ignored his cries for help as inmates attacked him.

After other allegations of excessive force, Mayor Michael Hancock ordered a top-to-bottom review of the department and forced Sheriff Gary Wilson to step down.

The city is now trying to make changes and by the end of the year, it hopes to create a plan to set a new standard of accountability, strengthen protocols and help chart a new direction for the department.

The city will compile all of the community feedback in a report and give it to an independent firm that will review the department and search for a new sheriff.

Three task forces made up of law enforcement leaders and other community members have already made their recommendations for changes to the department. The city will also put its recommendations in a report to give the firm by the end of September.


  • Anonymous

    Fire every single one of them and start over. They all knew what was going on inside that place and never complained once. You need to completely get rid of the cancer and start over.

    • Anonymous

      That was going to be my comment also, Second the motion.

      Hire or volunteer police “police” that have only one authorization – ability to stop illegal police action with the use of deadly force.

      Have that hanging over their heads and we might have some respect for the law

    • Anonymous

      Or you can do your homework and look at the fact that this whole lawsuit was planned from the get go you idiot!!! Did this inmate or his lawyer talk about filing charges or any lawsuits against his “attackers” no!! His “attacker” were in on it.

    • Anonymous

      Since you want to talk negative about the department come down and apply. I bet you wouldn’t last ten seconds if you were placed in some of situations we deal with. We’re hiring prove me right :-P

  • old guy

    Gag all the inmates, then they can’t harass the guards and each other. It seems the Sheriff’s dept. needs the 1.5 m. the police are going to spend on camera’s, OK at least 1/2 the money.

  • Ray

    et the ACLU be the Denver Sheriff Department – and soon we won’t have many problems in Denver….Like the obscene traffic….

  • Anonymous

    The department has laws, rules, policies and procedures to guide them. Maybe the department should enforce employees to follow them or be disciplined. Bad employees and not the city should be responsible for the millions in payouts to the victims of their misconduct.

  • Kae Mechiso

    The department has laws, rules, policies and procedures to guide them. Maybe the department should enforce employees to follow them or be disciplined. Bad employees and not the city should be responsible for the millions in payouts to the victims of their misconduct.

    • L Berry

      That is a very good point. Part of the act of operating with impunity is the knowledge that one is does not have to answer for their actions. If there were a mandated contract that requires these officers to be liable monetarily for their actions, they might think twice about their reactions. Also, require all officers to wear cameras to record their actions while they are on the patrol and have reviews of the footage. Similar to random drug testing. It’s a shame that you have to “police” the police but that is what it has come down to.

  • Test

    This stuff is only hard for liberals. If you reward bad behavior you get more of it. The “broken” immigration system is having the same issues. People break the law, and benefit. Soon more and more people are breaking the law. This stuff is not hard to figure out.

  • John Smoth

    How about you jail every officer who breaks the law like you do for the rest of us AND garnish their paycheck to pay for any lost city money from their actions. THAT and only that will clean up the department REALLY fast.

  • deleted

    That’s right people keep believing the media always tells the whole story .. Gullible bleeding hearts crack me up… The second these criminals enter your lives you will be begging someone to care . I guess it’s a fluffy perfect world and criminals don’t act out when left alone. It’s sad where our hug a thug country is headed.

    • Anonymous

      Exactly!!!!!! The bottom line is these guys are locked up for a reason PERIOD!! If everybody does their research and see what they are locked up for and if the media would play the WHOLE footage of situations as well as audio their opinions would change. Does anybody know that this Jamal hunter was in on domestic violence, assault, and two other felony charges? I think not!! I work in law enforcement and I will admit not everybody locked up is bad but more importantly not everybody locked up is good either.

    • Anonymous

      I can demonstrate that the criminal justice system is corrupt through and through. In fact, I already have and still do. All of my evidence is public record, and it spans 30 years in two states. There is no way conceivable that so much proof could be mere happenstance and that a guilty guy could be acquitted, have cases overturned, and win so many times if the cases weren’t bogus to begin with.

Comments are closed.