Broncos’ priest helps with players’ faith, and cheering them on to victory

Posted on: 10:02 pm, January 21, 2014, by

DENVER — Before each big game on Sunday, some Broncos players and their families take time for the faith on Saturday.

The priest who leads Catholic Mass for the Broncos spoke with FOX31 Denver’s Justin Joseph Tuesday about his role in getting members of the team ready to compete on Sunday.

Father Phil Steele, SJ is a fan of the Broncos and he sits in the stands to cheer the players on. But he also uses his voice to lead some of them in prayer.

See more about his role with the team in Justin’s video report.

The Broncos also have a non-denominational service on Saturdays.

 

9 comments

  • Bob says:

    Now there’s no point in even playing the game. There’s an imaginary deity backing the Broncos, so there’s no doubt about the outcome. Stay home and save embarrassment, Seattle.

  • kelly says:

    I guess all those starving AIDS babies in war torn Africa will just have to wait for football season to end. I mean obviously helping over paid sports figures win is FAR more important. THIS is in large part why I’m atheist. The absolute lack of sense and reason is shocking.

  • Emily says:

    I went to Regis and had the amazing opportunity to hear this man speak. Kelly, it is possible to pray for more than one person at a time. The school he preaches at (my old school) raised thousands of dollars for people in Uganda. No one get’s left out in our prayers. but sometimes it is good to pray for things that bring us joy too. Don’t judge until you know the full story.

  • Nick S says:

    lol @ kelly

  • Arodef says:

    Kelly and Bob are pinnacles of atheist bravery. Kelly, I tip my fedora to you, m’lady. It’s pretty obvious that Christians don’t care about starving babies in Africa during football season, so I’ll be making a non-profit donation of Mountain Dew and Doritos in the name of Carl Sagan and Richard Dawkins.

    Christians are literally the most judgmental people ever, and if you don’t agree you can f**k off. Regis Jesuit does nothing to teach its students to be euphoric from logic and reason, instead relying on a phony god’s blessing.

  • John says:

    I think that Bob, Kelly, Emily, and yes even Arodef the troll have good points to be made. Thanks for sharing your opinions.

    I am an anti-contrarian I suppose. Either way, I’ll give the old agnostic try:

    Bob, sects of Hindu’s believe that their deities do NOT mold the world with their imaginary god-hands. Rather, when YOU focus on the values they stand for (focus, patience, courage… etc) you are molding yourself into a force that changes the world. Fascinating thought food, even if not as impactful as studying film and lifting heavies.

    Kelly, great point but why single out the Steele? Manning has dedicated his whole life to a trivial cause of football, and has THOUSANDS of times more media surrounding him. Steele spends part of his time organizing efforts to help “starving AIDS babies” and I bet he recognizes the “starving AIDS babies” with a more respectful manner.

    Emily, thanks for your insights I think you are spot on. I do however think that more action needs to be done than only prayer, I’m pretty sure that wasn’t your point though so sorry if that offends you.

    Arodef, or should i say Backwards fedora, I see your game. But most people will be confused –> offended by your trollish tone. Not sure if that is what you are going for. I guess those people can just f*** off…

  • Cyn says:

    Good job, Emily! My 3 children were fortunate to graduate from Regis too. They have lived up to the Jesuit Mission of “men and women of and for others” continuing community service in Vietnam, El Salvador, the re-build in New Orleans, Habitat for Humanity in the Appalachians, 8 hours weekly in a local soup kitchen to name a few of their commitments. My husband leaves for 10 days in Kenya next week, giving his time to children and expertise to improvements to their orphanage.

    The great aspect of the Catholic order of Jesuits is the community service and social justice emphasis which all students, regardless of faith, are taught at Regis as well as other Jesuit institutions. Pope Francis is the perfect example of a Jesuit life.

    It’s obvious this “offensive” news story was intended to be a light, fun, fluff piece, and not offend anyone. Go Broncos!

  • Adoraf says:

    John: Was trying to establish a point, sorry if anyone gets offended.

    I’m actually a Christian. And, quite frankly, the excuse that “Steele’s neglecting kids in Africa because of football” is pretty heinous. It doesn’t make sense and pretty much neglects everything Father Steele does.

    I know atheists who are respectful of others’ beliefs. I’ve also had the displeasure of meeting a few who aren’t.

    Kelly: Nice strawman argument there. Straw burns pretty easily, though.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi, I just wanted to put something out there real brief :). I actually go to Regis now, and trust me, while we love our football, we are also very dedicated to being with and for others. Did you know Regis has a full two weeks off of school for juioners and seniors dedicated for just service? Did you also know that we are required to have 25 hours of direct service with those less fortunate in order to graduate? We are also taught to respect others, even if they strongly disagree with us in all areas, because they are people too? I’m sure those of you who have posted do things in your free time, like browsing the internet ;), instead of saving babies 24/7. Can’t Father Steele help all people, even those in the public eye, pray to the God he believes in during his spare time? He is an understanding priest, and if you really want his opinion you should contact him instead of cuss him out in the contacts section, I’m sure he’d be happy to talk. He doesn’t shove his ideas in your face, he lives them out, so is it really fair to say he should live your way? Hope I didn’t offend anyone too badly, hope you get the fund raiser out for Mountain Dew and Doritos! ;)

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