Rand Paul’s bestiality comment was sarcasm, office says

Posted on: 9:16 am, June 27, 2013, by

Sen. Rand Paul's criticism of Wednesday's same-sex marriage ruling, which included a rhetorical question about bestiality eventually being made legal, was sarcasm, the Kentucky Republican's office says.

Sen. Rand Paul's criticism of Wednesday's same-sex marriage ruling, which included a rhetorical question about bestiality eventually being made legal, was sarcasm, the Kentucky Republican's office says.

(CNN) — Sen. Rand Paul’s criticism of Wednesday’s same-sex marriage ruling, which included a rhetorical question about bestiality eventually being made legal, was sarcasm, the Kentucky Republican’s office says.

Speaking to conservative radio host Glenn Beck, Paul delved into the question of whether or not lawmakers should imbue legislation with their own morals. Beck set up the statement by wondering whether the court’s ruling – which found a key provision of the federal Defense of Marriage Act unconstitutional – could logically lead to polygamy becoming legal.

“If you change one variable – man and a woman – to a man and a man and a woman and a woman, you cannot tell me then that you can’t logically change the other variable,” Beck said. “One man, three women. One woman, four men. Who are you to say that if I am a devout Muslim and I come over here and I have three wives, who are you to say if I am an American citizen that I can’t have multiple marriages?”

Paul, a potential 2016 presidential candidate whose supporters include a large number of libertarian-leaning conservatives, said Beck was getting at a larger question of whether laws can include moral designations.

“This is a conundrum, and it gets back to what you were saying …whether or not churches should decide this,” Paul said. “And it is difficult, because if we have no laws on this, people take it to one extension further. Does it have to be humans?”

That remark, his office said, wasn’t meant to be taken seriously.

“Sarcasm sometimes doesn’t translate adequately from radio conversation,” his communications director Moira Bagley said. “Sen. Paul did not suggest that striking down DOMA could lead to unusual marriage arrangements. What he was discussing was that having the state recognize marriage without definition could lead to marriages with no basis in reality.”

Later in the interview, Paul stressed the economic importance of stable marriages for children.

“I also see that economically, if you don’t look at it with any moral periscope, and you say, ‘What is it that is the leading cause of poverty in our country?’ It’s having kids without marriage,” Paul said. “That stability of the marriage unit is enormous, and we should not say we’re punting on it and marriage can be anything.”

Later, in an interview with ABC News, Paul said he thought the Supreme Court ruling on DOMA was appropriate and said the issue should be one left to the states.

As for the growing divide among Republicans on same-sex marriage, Paul said “the party is going to have to agree to disagree on some of these issues.”