Fire danger prevalent across Colorado due to rising temperatures

LYONS, Colo. — As the intense sun was rising and getting set to beat down on Colorado Tuesday, firefighters were bracing themselves for another day on high alert in high-risk fire areas.

Yesterday, the Denver area broke record highs with temperatures reaching 99 degrees, and firefighters scrambled to put out several wildfires in the surrounding areas of Lyons and Frasier. They’re hoping things go just as smoothly Tuesday.

“Conditions are prime for fire this week,” Boulder County Sheriff’s Office spokesperson Jay Stalnacker said. “We’re in the high 90s for the rest of the week.”

The blaze that broke out near Fraser Monday got dangerously close to a library. Thankfully crews were able to get it under control before it damaged any property.

In Lyons, lighting may have started a blaze dubbed the Big Meadows Fire. Though one private structure was threatened, no structures were damaged in a fire that was contained almost entirely to private property.

Homeowners like Chris Anton know fire season is unpredictable. Blade-by-blade, branch-by-branch, he’s worked tirelessly mitigating the landscape around his home.

“We annually go through in the spring and trim away any of the dead branches,” Anton said.

Up and down the Front Range, the fire danger is high. A wildfire in Colorado Springs ignited near the Air Force Academy. Lightning was spotted in the area before the fire was reported.

Yet another fire, dubbed the Big Meadow Fire, popped up on the west side of Rocky Mountain National Park, burning about two acres of grass before crews could get it under control. It too was likely caused by lightning.

“We’re really one start away from a potential serious fire,” Stalnacker said. “We’re expecting dry lightning, we’re expecting a lot of recreation in the forest. Those two combined gives us plenty of reason to be concerned.”