Bye-bye, pork chops: New meat names on the way

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.
The Uniform Retail Meat Identification Standards agency surveyed consumers who seem to be puzzled about the names of beef and pork cuts, and to help customers figure out the difference between a pork butt and rump roast, there will be new names for everything from pork chops to steaks.

(File photo credit: CNN)

DENVER — Slumping meat sales have prompted more than 350 cuts of meat to the chopping block… when it comes to names of the cuts. The Uniform Retail Meat Identification Standards agency surveyed consumers who seem to be puzzled about the names of beef and pork cuts, and to help customers figure out the difference between a pork butt and rump roast, there will be new names for everything from pork chops to steaks.

“We are ready to help consumers who are a bit meat challenged,” said Joe Prince of Marczyk’s Market on 17th Avenue in Uptown. “There have been changes in names of fish in the past and most quickly figured things out, but never have there been 350 names in need of change.”

Pork Chops: Loin cuts of white meat will see Pork Loin top loin chops turn into Porterhouse Chops, Top Loin will become New York Chops, Pork Loin Rib Chops turn into Ribeye Chops, and Bone-in become T-Bone Chops.

For beef, a boneless shoulder top blade steak becomes a flatiron steak, a beef under blade boneless steak turns into a Denver steak. Not all names will change ground beef remains ground beef and a chicken—which is not affected—stays a chicken breast.

“I think shoppers are confused when they see butler steaks, top blade steaks, boneless, flat iron, many simply walk away not sure of what cut they are even looking at,” said Jay Dalton. “At first people will be wondering, but they will catch on for sure.”

Overseas demand for U.S meat has slowed this spring, cool weather is keeping grills under wraps, and so protein is clogging the nation’s food supply chain — while store freezers are stocked full, hitting a record high in February, according to the Agriculture Department.

So with the changes to make picking your meats easier, the hope is customers don’t just start yelling, “Where’s the beef and pork I love?”