Watch live: FOX31 News at 5 p.m.

Bret Thompson convicted of kidnapping, sexual assault of child

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.
Bret Thompson

Bret Thompson

DENVER -- After less than two hours of deliberation, a jury convicted Bret Thompson of second-degree kidnapping and sexual assault on a child Monday morning.

Thompson was accused of kidnapping an 8-year-old girl from her west Denver neighborhood in 2011, taking her to Aurora, sexually assaulting her and then dropping her off at a gas station. He left Colorado and was arrested in New Jersey several days later.

Last Tuesday in court, the victim pointed toward Thompson and described her kidnapping before leaving the witness stand in tears.

A friend of the victim, a 13-year-old boy, was the first to testify Tuesday. He said the two were taking a dog for a walk when Thompson pulled up next to them in a van.

He asked the victim to help him throw away a TV box, the friend testified.

The boy said Thompson lifted the victim up so she could throw the box into a trash bin and then put her in his van and drove off.

The victim then took the witness stand and described the abduction.

“He put me in the van in front between the two seats,” the victim said.

Prosecutor Allison Rocker asked, “Were you scared?”

“Yes,” the girl said.

The victim said Thompson drove to his house in Aurora and touched her with a body part. She started crying and then he drove her to an alley near a gas station, the girl said.

She left the van and went into the gas station and asked for help. A clerk called the girl’s parents and police.

When Rocker asked the girl to point out her kidnapper, she pointed to Thompson and then started crying and had to leave the courtroom.

Thompson pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity due to dissociative disorder. The disorder, which used to be called multiple personality disorder, is a condition where someone can develop alternate identities, often as a reaction to trauma and to help keep difficult memories at bay.

After his arrest, Thompson told police “When I went out that day, I was like someone else. Like a puppet on strings. I felt that breaking point.”