Skydiver lands safely after historic jump, sets record

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.
Baumgartner celebrates after successfully completing the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos mission (CNN)

Baumgartner celebrates after successfully completing the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos mission (CNN)

(CNN) — Skydiver Felix Baumgartner landed safely on the ground Sunday after a record-shattering jump from the edge of space.

“He made it — tears of joy from Mission Control,” the team said in a live feed.

Baumgartner left the capsule attached to a huge helium balloon at 128,000 feet — 24 miles up — higher than anyone before him.

After an initial free fall, he opened his parachute and glided down to the ground, where he smiling and hugging members of his team.

It may not have been the longest-lasting free fall. Mission Control said during the jump that Baumgartner did not “break the record for time elapsed” before pulling the parachute.

His highest estimated speed on the way down was 729 mph.

“Guardian angels will take care of you,” said Mission Control just before he jumped.

“The whole world is watching now,” Baumgartner said, before giving a salute and jumping.

Applause broke out in Mission Control when he touched down, and Baumgartner fell to his knees with his fists raised.

Read the rest of the story at CNN.com.