Greenwood Village mom makes crib innovation

Posted on: 10:08 pm, June 19, 2012, by , updated on: 10:06am, June 20, 2012

They’re a staple in nurseries across the country. But crib bumpers can also raise the danger of suffocation.

Now, a Greenwood Village mother has a solution.

Sarah Pendleton took a walk through Washington Park with her four kids — her latest arrived just six months ago.

“I probably won’t ever use them with her,” she said about crib padding found in stores nationwide.

She said she’ll walk away from them because her experience was not so great with her three other kids.

“They get tangled in them, or they get their heads stuck under them,” she said.

Crib bumpers can also be deadly, and the consumer product safety commission is re-examing their safety in light of 52 infant deaths in 20 years.

“We were already very concerned with the safe sleep issue,” Greenwood Village mother Catherine Hall said.

So the mother of three invented Wonder Bumpers.

They’re padded, vertical crib guards that you zip onto each individual rail of the crib — unlike traditional bumpers that cover a crib’s entire lower perimeter.

“Your baby rolls over into a bumper, there’s a chance of suffocation. With an opening between slats with Wonder Bumpers, you don’t have that risk,” Hall said.

But the owner of Guys and Dolls — a store selling baby products for nearly 60 years — said they’ve sold traditional bumpers without issue.

Jason Rivkin said it comes down to parenting.

“I think the biggest issue for unsafe sleeping environment is when a child is unattended for long periods of time. I think it’s important to check on children, make sure they’re breathing and everything is okay,” he said.

He does agree though that bumpers might not always be appropriate.

“You can use bumpers at first when infants don’t move much in the crib. There may be a period later on when the child starts rolling that you’ll want to take it away, out of the crib. Then, after the child develops motor function and could move something off his face if their breathing was blocked, go back to using them,” Rivkin said.

Hall is sticking to her side of the story.

“Eventually, traditional bumpers will be outlawed. I do think eventually they will be illegal as they are in two places right now,” Hall said.

The city of Chicago already banned the sale of traditional bumpers, and the state of Maryland will vote on enacting a statewide ban next month.

Wonder Bumpers start at $99. You can order yours at www.wonderbumpers.com. The company is currently offering a 50-percent discount for people who turn in their traditional bumpers to Wonder Bumpers.